Category Archives: 2013 Volume 3 Issue 1

Punishing Infanticide in the Irish Free State

Dr. Karen Brennan IJLS Volume 3 Issue 1 Article 1 This article explores sentencing of women convicted of infanticide offences at the Central Criminal Court between 1922 and 1949. A sample of 124 cases involving women who had been convicted … Continue reading

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Post-Acquittal Retrials for Serious Offences in the Irish Criminal Justice Process: Lessons from England and Wales

Dr. Gerard Coffey Volume 3 Issue 1 Article 2 The common law principle against retrials for the same criminal offence is a fundamental principle of criminal justice and procedure common to legal systems concerned with securing protection of fundamental rights … Continue reading

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Nineteenth-Century Criminal Justice: Uniquely Irish or Simply “not English”?

Niamh Howlin Volume 3 Issue 1 Article 3 This article examines the supposed uniqueness of the Irish criminal justice system in the nineteenth century. Although the English and Irish systems of criminal justice shared common roots, by the nineteenth century … Continue reading

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Improvising (Il)Legality: Justice and the Irish Diaspora, N.Y.C., 1930-32

Sara Ramshaw Volume 3 Issue 1 Article 4 The Seabury Commission, 1930-32, probed allegations of corruption made against, amongst others, the Irish-American Mayor of New York City, James J. ‘Jimmy’ Walker, and the Irish-dominated Tammany Hall, the Democratic political machine … Continue reading

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