Tag Archives: courts

Judicial Diversity in Ireland

Dr. Laura Cahillane Vol_6_Issue_1_Article_1 Judicial diversity is not a subject which is much discussed in Ireland. Despite the fact that our judiciary is still a relatively homogenous group with figures on female judges only recently improving, it seems neither the … Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Volume 6 Issue 1 | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Judicial Diversity in Ireland

Introduction to the special issue

Creating equitable access to justice for people with disabilities  as victims of crime: Ireland’s criminal justice system and the challenge of disability rights. Claire Edwards, Shane Kilcommins and Gill Harold Vol_5_Issue_1_Article_1 Recent years have witnessed an increasing focus on the … Continue reading

Posted in 2015 Volume 5 Issue 1 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Introduction to the special issue

Access to justice in civil and criminal proceedings: the barriers facing persons with an intellectual disability

Deirdre Carroll Vol_5_Issue_1_Article_4 This paper critically considers key issues pertaining to the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities when engaged in civil and criminal proceedings. From an organisational perspective, these matters are explored in detail through an overview of case … Continue reading

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Television Courtroom Broadcasting and Eye Tracking: An Irish Solution to the U.S. Supreme Court Research Challenge?

Paul Lambert Volume_2_Issue_2_Article_1 Television courtroom broadcasting is an important and topical issue. Debate frequently centers on the possible effects, positive and negative. This layer of television courtroom broadcasting analysis has also troubled the U.S. Supreme Court in three camera cases, … Continue reading

Posted in 2011 Volume 2 Issue 2 | Tagged , | Comments Off on Television Courtroom Broadcasting and Eye Tracking: An Irish Solution to the U.S. Supreme Court Research Challenge?