Tag Archives: criminal procedure

The Origins of Sentencing Councils and Commissions

Paul Hughes Vol_5_Issue_2_Article 4 Sentencing systems in existence in different jurisdictions vary greatly. Traditionally, jurisdictions opted for guidance in the form of legislation, guiding principles from the appellate courts, guideline judgments or a combination of these. Since the mid-1970s, a … Continue reading

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Introduction to the special issue

Creating equitable access to justice for people with disabilities  as victims of crime: Ireland’s criminal justice system and the challenge of disability rights. Claire Edwards, Shane Kilcommins and Gill Harold Vol_5_Issue_1_Article_1 Recent years have witnessed an increasing focus on the … Continue reading

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Sexual Offences and Capacity to Consent: Key Issues

Raymond Byrne Vol_5_Issue_1_Article_3 This paper explores some key issues with regard to sexual offences and capacity to consent. The paper critically considers law reform relating to capacity, engaging with important matters such as protection and empowerment, the contents of the … Continue reading

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Access to justice in civil and criminal proceedings: the barriers facing persons with an intellectual disability

Deirdre Carroll Vol_5_Issue_1_Article_4 This paper critically considers key issues pertaining to the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities when engaged in civil and criminal proceedings. From an organisational perspective, these matters are explored in detail through an overview of case … Continue reading

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