Tag Archives: family law

Extending the “Right to Identity” to Donor-Conceived Children in Ireland: A Jurisdictional Case Study

Dr. Donna Lyons Vol_7_Issue_1_Article_1 This article considers the “right to identity” provisions in the Children and Family Relationships Act 2015 and their adequacy in guaranteeing to the donor-conceived child the right to access identifying donor information in this jurisdiction. The … Continue reading

Posted in 2017 Volume 7 Issue 1 | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Extending the “Right to Identity” to Donor-Conceived Children in Ireland: A Jurisdictional Case Study

Surrogacy, Equal Status and Social Welfare Benefits

Mel Cousins Vol_6_Issue_1_Article_4 This case note discusses the recent High Court decision concerning a claim under the Equal Status Acts 2000-2012 arguing that the failure of the Department of Social Protection to provide a payment during surrogacy leave – equivalent … Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Volume 6 Issue 1 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Surrogacy, Equal Status and Social Welfare Benefits

Cognitive Impairment and the Capacity to Marry

Dr Frances Matthews Vol_5_Issue_2_Article 3 In Ireland, and many other countries, only adults with the necessary decision making capacity are lawfully able to marry. The validity of a marriage is governed by statutory and common law considerations. The Assisted Decision … Continue reading

Posted in 2015 Volume 5 Issue 2 | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Cognitive Impairment and the Capacity to Marry

Parenting arrangements and relocation law in England and Wales, and Canada: In search of better rules and guidelines

Ghislaine Lanteigne Vol_4_Issue_1_Article_3 In disputes over a proposed relocation (where usually the non-resident/non-custodial parent in the separated or divorced couple opposes the primary carer who is proposing to relocate with the child) parents may have to seek a court decision … Continue reading

Posted in 2014 Volume 4 Issue 1 | Tagged | Comments Off on Parenting arrangements and relocation law in England and Wales, and Canada: In search of better rules and guidelines